August 3, 2021

Raven Tribune

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“Breakthrough in history”: Jury finds Floyd’s killer guilty


Update
“Breakthrough in History”

The jury found Floyd’s killer guilty

Nearly a year after George Floyd’s violent death, the policeman who detained him for several minutes is under investigation. It is now clear that the verdict has been handed down. The arbitral tribunal found Derek Chou guilty of all charges.

Almost a year after the assassination of African American George Floyd, the arbitral tribunal granted it White ex-guard Derek Suev Proven guilty in all charges. He is serving a long prison sentence. Judge Peter Cahill in Minneapolis, Minnesota, said the exact sentence would be determined in eight weeks. The judge also quashed his release on death bail. Defendant, who heard the verdict with unshakable expression, was handcuffed outside the courtroom.

In the judgment of Derek Suev.

(Photo: via REUTERS)

People waiting outside the court burst into tears and cheers. Defense can appeal against the verdict. Floyd, 46, was killed in an arrest in Minneapolis on May 25 last year. The videos document how the police pushed the unarmed man to the ground. For a good nine minutes Sue’s knee pressed against Floyd’s neck, while Floyd begged him to let him breathe. According to the autopsy, Floyd left and died shortly afterwards. Authorities arrested him on suspicion of paying a fake $ 20 bill.

The most serious charge against Suu Kyi is second-degree murder. Imprisonment for up to 40 years in Minnesota. According to German law, this is like murder. Suu Kyi was also charged with third-degree murder, punishable by up to 25 years in prison. He had to answer for the second massacre, which resulted in a ten-year prison sentence. Under German law, this charge is tantamount to careless murder. Suu Kyi pleaded not guilty. Experts believe that a suv, who has not previously had a criminal record, should receive a significantly lower sentence than the maximum allowed. However, the public prosecutor’s office can file an application within a week to apply for a higher sentence due to the specific attraction of the offense.

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Sober mood on the streets

Floyd’s family lawyer Ben Crump called the verdict “a turning point in history.” “Guild!” Crump wrote on Twitter. “Finally the most deserving justice has come to George Floyd’s family. The verdict sends a clear message that law enforcement is also accountable.” “

Floyd’s brother Pillonis was also relieved: “Justice for George is freedom for all,” Floyd said. “Today we can breathe again.” Shortly before George Floyd’s death he pleaded again and again – “I breathe a breath” – which became the slogan of protests against police violence and racism.

There was a festive atmosphere in front of the heavily guarded court in Minneapolis, with hundreds of people cheering. Attendees chanted “Black Lives Matter” and “Who won? We won”. They called it the name of George Floyd. Traffic was halted on surrounding streets. People also gathered at today’s “George Floyd Flats”, a former crime scene.

After Floyd died, frustration was expelled

Floyd’s fate sparked waves of protests against racism and police violence in the United States amid the Corona epidemic. “Black Lives Matter” emerged as the largest protest movement in decades and sparked controversy beyond the borders of the United States. In many places, police reforms were initiated as a result. The bill for police reforms named after George Floyd is pending in the US Congress. The Democratic-controlled House of Representatives has approved the bill, but the Senate also needs the approval of some Republicans. This is not yet expected.

The expectations of the trial in the United States are enormous: many, including many blacks, have been waiting for a verdict that sends a signal against racism and police violence. Former US President Barack Obama has called for deeper reconsideration and reform after the verdict. “We need to see the fact that real justice is being treated differently by black Americans every day,” Obama said on behalf of his wife, Michael. “We need to acknowledge that millions of our friends, family and fellow citizens are living in fear that the next meeting with the police will be their last.”

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Fear of new struggles

According to the U.S. legal system, the decision on whether to be guilty or not fell on the arbitral tribunal. There was no time limit for the discussions of the twelve arbitral tribunals which had been going on since Monday afternoon. You were staying at a hotel during the interview. Their verdict had to be given unanimously. As a result of the investigation, a number of security forces, including National Guard soldiers, were stationed in Minneapolis. Governor Tim Walls has previously called for peaceful protests to avoid riots and “chaos.”

The city of Minneapolis has already agreed to pay $ 27 million (approximately .6 22.6 million) in March due to police action with Floyd’s family. Criminal activities were not directly affected. Suu Kyi’s defense attorney, Eric Nelson, argued that Suu Kyi’s use of force was justified in opposing Floyd’s arrest. He assumed that Floyd’s death was not primarily due to violence, but mainly from heart problems and drug residues in his blood. Prosecution experts clearly rejected this argument. e.For example, a pulmonologist said that Floyd had died of a lack of oxygen. Low oxygen levels caused brain damage and Floyd’s heart stopped. Minneapolis Police Chief Mataria Aradonto described Suu Kyi’s use of force as “unequal and illegal.”

Chu was released after Floyd died. He was released on bail and appeared throughout the trial. In addition to Suu Kyi, three former police officers involved in the operation against Floyd have been indicted and will appear in private on Aug. 23. Help is imposed on them. They too could face lengthy prison sentences.

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